Trials & Tribulations of capturing those Pole Photos!

photoshoot

Trials & tribulations of Pole Photography
So you’ve been to a few pole classes now and may want a few photos to share with friends and family and to capture your achievements. Great, Just grab a friend and a camera (or probably a phone these days), point and click… easy right?! Oh no no no…..
Well yeah, you could, but you’re more likely to end up with pole mishaps than pole marvel. Here are a few things to think about to try and get those fab pics you deserve in less time.

1) Make sure you’re ready!
Make sure you are comfortable and ready to hold the move you want a picture of for a decent time frame. Generally you’ll need to be able to SAFELY hold the move for more than a couple of seconds before being able to capture the moment on camera. It is fine to have your instructor or spotter in the picture if it’s a particularly tricky move that you’d like but still don’t feel 100% (possibly in the case of a workshop where you’d like the move to remember but haven’t had time to perfect it) but they shouldn’t be actually visibly holding you up in the picture, unless it’s a multi-person move. (Doubles, triples etc..) Also bear in mind you don’t have to be doing the most complicated move there is for it to look impressive, some of the simple moves look lovely as a picture, whilst the difficulty and effort of some of the harder ones just doesn’t come out on the other side of a lens.

2) It’s all about the angles!
If you are getting a non- pole friend to take the picture make sure you show them the angle it should be taken at, I’ve frequently seen people taking pictures so that you have no idea what move its supposed to be and it really doesn’t do the move (or your body) Justice. You end up with that awkward moment when you’re friend is really proud of herself for taking the picture and when you look at it you’re thinking… ‘Oh no, that totally doesn’t look like it’s supposed to.. I look awful!’ but instead you smile and say ‘Aw, that’s great thanks!’ Also try and suggest they stand a bit further back, you can always zoom in and crop on a photo to get closer but can’t zoom out any further than the original shot. This also applies to videos too, I remember when filming for a TV programme, when they’ve edited it they’ve zoomed in on my crotch for some bizarre reason and missed the move in its entirety (Total cringe). I think the move might have been a Cupid drop into Gemini… I remember being gutted because the whole combo was great and it really didn’t show the performance in a great light. And these were meant to be professionals. Don’t panic too much however about the fact you can ‘See the cellulite in my thighs’.. We all have body hang ups, but people will be more impressed you’re hanging upside down by one leg rather than anything else.

3) Check your background!
I’m sure we’ve all seen that unfortunate picture of the poor girl who posted her pole picture online and what seemed to be her pink dildo was sitting on the radiator! It was in fact a ballet slipper, but the press and online community had field day with it. I have to admit I have been guilty of this in the past, (not for leaving my sex toys laying around, but not checking my backdrop before excitedly posting pics on Facebook or Instagram) You don’t want the glory of your amazing move to be outshone by some busybody pointing out that your room is messy or that there are random items in the background stealing the limelight. Also watch out for mirrors.. they can be friend or foe. Used correctly they can reflect your good side to get 2 angle at once, but also picking up people and things not in direct line of the camera lens.

4) If you go Pro – Research your Professional!
There are lots of great professional photographers out there but not all of them specialize in the same themes and Pole is still a relatively new concept. If you’re going to spend your hard earned money on some nice shots make sure you get one that is familiar with the industry. Maybe use one that a pole friend or studio has used and you like the look of the photos they’ve done elsewhere. There have been some really creative and original ideas surfacing recently, take a look around and don’t feel pressured to make a choice you don’t feel comfortable with.

5) Relax and Smile!
Yep.. we’ve all seen that uncomfortable pain/concentration face we pull when trying to get into or hold a move. We’ve all done it, it’s a natural part of the process, but it’s not pretty. So ideally, on a photo immortalized for the world to see, we do not want to look like a panic stricken constipated monkey clinging onto a tree for dear life! I know the ‘Relax and smile’ comment is easier said than done, try and invoke ‘Serene Pole Goddess’… (Is there even a Goddess of pole? If not, why not? We should appoint one!) You don’t necessarily have to smile, you can go for the ‘Yay, I can’t believe I’m doing it!’ Excited/shocked face, or you can be silly and have a laugh- tongues out/thumbs up pose, or go for the ‘serious arty’ look. But the relaxed bit is the important part I feel. Whatever you choose is fine, you don’t even have to look at the camera to get a beautiful picture.

I hope this helps a little on your pole photo mission, but just on a little side note make sure you’re not spending too much time dedicated to just taking pictures of moves, and don’t just learn a move, take a picture and move on to the next. Enjoy your classes; listen to your instructors and peers. Make sure you spend time getting in and out of the moves correctly and learning how to transition nicely from one move to the next. It’s all well and good learning individual moves but if you can’t put them together you may regret it at a later date. Apart from that.. go forth, be proud of what you’re doing and capture those amazing accomplishments for the world to see!

Pole Love. xxx

(Ps if you would like to recommend any pole photographers feel free to comment)

For more reading like this click

http://www.amazon.co.uk/So-hear-youre-Pole-Dancer/dp/1502859424/

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